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Home > Facts > Almanac > Hydropower to State Motto

Oregon Almanac: Hydropower Projects to State Motto

The Owyhee Dam in Malheur County is one of the larger concrete arch gravity dams in the world. (Scenic photo no. malD0117)

The Owyhee Dam in Malheur County is one of the larger concrete arch gravity dams in the world. (Scenic photo no. malD0117)

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Hydropower Projects, Largest
Owyhee Dam: Owyhee River, 1932
Bonneville Dam: Columbia River, 1938
McNary Dam: Columbia River, 1954
The Dalles Dam: Columbia River, 1957
John Day Dam: Columbia River, 1971

 

The legislature designated the Oregon Swallowtail butterfly as Oregon's official state insect in 1979. The habitat for the colorful butterfly includes sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries.

The legislature designated the Oregon Swallowtail butterfly as Oregon's official state insect in 1979. The habitat for the colorful butterfly includes sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Insect, State
In 1979, the Legislature designated the Oregon Swallowtail (Papilio oregonius) as the Oregon state insect. A true native of the Northwest, the Oregon Swallowtail is at home in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage. This strikingly beautiful butterfly has a wingspan of 2-1/2 to 3 inches and is bright yellow and black with a reddish-orange hindspot.

 

Jails/Correctional Institutions
189 secure facilities, including adult jails, lockups and correctional facilities, court holding facilities, juvenile detention centers and correctional facilities, and mental health centers;
175 non-secure facilities, including law enforcement centers and residential centers;
14 institutions operated by the Department of Corrections, including release, work centers and camps;
One federal penal institution.

 

Judicial Districts: 27

 

Crater Lake in the Cascade Mountains is the deepest lake in the United States. (Scenic photo no. klaDA0067a)

Crater Lake in the Cascade Mountains is the deepest lake in the United States. (Scenic photo no. klaDA0067a)

Lake, Deepest
Crater Lake: 1,949' (deepest in the United States)

 

Lakes, Largest
Upper Klamath Lake, 58,922 surface acres
Malheur Lake, 49,000 surface acres
Note: Size may vary depending on seasons and precipitation. At times, Malheur Lake may have a larger surface area than Upper Klamath Lake.

 

Lakes, Number: Approximately 1,780 lakes in Oregon

 

Legal Holidays
New Year’s Day: 1/1/13, 1/1/14, 1/1/15
Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday (observed): 1/21/13, 1/20/14, 1/19/15
President’s Day: 2/18/13, 2/17/14, 2/16/15
Memorial Day:5/27/13, 5/26/14, 5/25/15
Independence Day: 7/4/13, 7/4/14, 7/3/15
Labor Day: 9/2/13, 9/1/14, 9/7/15
Veterans Day: 11/11/13, 11/11/14, 11/11/15
Thanksgiving Day: 11/28/13, 11/27/14, 11/26/15
Christmas Day: 12/25/13, 12/25/14, 12/25/15

 

Legal Special Observance Days
Additionally, other days may be legal holidays in Oregon. These are every day appointed by the governor as a holiday and every day appointed by the president of the United States as a day of mourning, rejoicing or other special observance when the governor also appoints that day as a holiday. Whenever a holiday falls on a Sunday, the following Monday shall be observed as the holiday. Whenever a holiday falls on a Saturday, the preceding Friday shall be observed as the holiday. At various intervals throughout the year, the governor may also proclaim days or weeks to give special recognition and attention to individuals or groups and to promote issues and causes.

 

The Coquille River Lighthouse near Bandon went into service in 1896. It is now part of Bullards Beach State Park. (Scenic photo no. cooD0162)

The Coquille River Lighthouse near Bandon went into service in 1896. It is now part of Bullards Beach State Park. (Scenic photo no. cooD0162)

Lighthouses
Cape Arago Lighthouse, Coos Bay
Cape Blanco Lighthouse, Port Orford
Cape Meares Lighthouse, Tillamook
Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse, Yachats (privately-owned, not open to the public)
Coquille River Lighthouse, Bandon
Heceta Head Lighthouse, Florence
Port of Brookings Lighthouse, Brookings
(privately-owned, not open to the public)
Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Cannon Beach
Umpqua River Lighthouse, Reedsport
Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, Newport
Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport

 

Marriages: 25,519 (2011)

 

Mileage Distances, Highways and Interstates (in Oregon)
I-5: 308 miles
I-84: 375 miles
U.S. 20: 450 miles
U.S. 26: 471 miles
U.S. 97: 296 miles
U.S. 101: 353 miles
U.S. 395: 384 miles

 

The sunny beaches of Miami are over 3,200 driving miles from Portland. Interstate 5 and Interstate 84 pass through Oregon, speeding travel to other major population centers.

The sunny beaches of Miami are over 3,200 driving miles from Portland. Interstate 5 and Interstate 84 pass through Oregon, speeding travel to other major population centers.

Mileage Distances, Road (from Portland)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,363
Atlanta, Georgia 2,596
Boise, Idaho 431
Chicago, Illinois 2,118
Denver, Colorado 1,240
Fargo, North Dakota 1,451
Houston, Texas 2,201
Los Angeles, California 962
Miami, Florida 3,236
New York, New York 2,893
Omaha, Nebraska 1,656
Phoenix, Arizona 1,312
St. Louis, Missouri 2,045
Salt Lake City, Utah 766
San Francisco, California 633
Seattle, Washington 174

 

Mother of Oregon

Mother of Oregon

Mother of Oregon
Honored by the 1987 Legislature as “Mother of Oregon,” Tabitha Moffatt Brown “represents the distinctive pioneer heritage and the charitable and compassionate nature of Oregon’s people.” At 66 years of age, she financed her own wagon for the trip from Missouri to Oregon. The boarding school for orphans that she established later became known as Tualatin Academy and eventually was chartered as Pacific University.

 

Motto, State
“She Flies With Her Own Wings” was adopted by the 1987 Legislature as the Oregon state motto. The phrase originated with Judge Jessie Quinn Thornton and was pictured on the territorial seal in Latin: Alis Volat Propriis. The new motto replaces “The Union,” which was adopted in 1957.

 

Also see related learning resource.

 

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