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Home > National > Oregon's Indian Tribes > Burns Paiute Tribe

Burns Paiute Tribe

A field near Burns in the vicinity of the Burns Paiute Reservation. (Scenic photo No. harDA0032a)

A field near Burns in the vicinity of the Burns Paiute Reservation. (Scenic photo No. harDA0032a)

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Contact
Address: HC-71 100 Pasigo St., Burns 97720
Phone: 541-573-2088
E-mail: dlteeman.burnspaiute@gmail.com
Web: www.burnspaiute-nsn.gov


About
Restoration: by Executive Order October 13, 1972
Number of Members: 349
Land Base Acreage: 13,736 acres
Number of people employed by the Tribe: 54


Economy
The Old Camp Casino and RV Park


Points of interest
Steens Mountain recreational area, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Reservation Day Pow Wow occurs two days each fall on or around October 13; annual Mothers’ Day Pow Wow.


Burns Paiute Tribe Map

History and culture
The Burns Paiute Reservation is located north of Burns in Harney County. Today’s tribal members are primarily the descendants of the "Wadatika" band of Paiutes who roamed central and eastern Oregon. The Wadatika, named for the wada seeds collected near Malheur Lake shores, lived on seeds, berries, roots and vegetation they gathered and wild animals they hunted. Their original territory included the area from the Cascade Mountains to Boise, Idaho, and the Blue Mountains to the Steens Mountains. Paiute legends say that the Paiutes have lived in this area since before the Cascade Mountains were formed, coming from the south as part of a migration throughout the Great Basin. People of the Burns Paiute Tribe were basket makers who used fibers of willow, sagebrush, tule plant and Indian hemp to weave baskets, sandals, fishing nets and traps. Archeologists have found clothing made from deer, animal and bird hides, and sandals made from sagebrush fibers believed to be close to 10,000 years old. The tribe continues to hunt and gather traditional foods and berries, and do beadwork and drum-making in traditional ways.


Tribal court
Tribal Judge Christie Timko; Associate Judge Patricia Davis, 100 Pasigo St., Burns 97720; 541-573-2793


Tribal council
Chairperson Charisse Soucie (2014); Vice-Chair Charlotte Roderique (2014); Secretary-Treasurer Vacant; Sergeant at Arms DeWayne Hoodie (2016); Members at Large Cecil Dick (2016), Eric Hawley (2015), Garrett Sam (2016), Lanada Teton (2015)

 

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